Article Date: 7/1/2010

Intravitreal Bevacizumab in a Silicone-filled Eye
Case Study

Intravitreal Bevacizumab in a Silicone-filled Eye

KEVIN K. SUK, MD • AUDINA M. BERROCAL, MD • TIMOTHY G. MURRAY, MD, MBA • DITTE HESS, CRA

A 26-week-old, 860-g premature infant who was the product of a quadruple pregnancy was initially evaluated at the Bascom Palmer Institute/Jackson Memorial Hospital at 34 weeks gestational age.

The neonate developed bilateral aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) at 37 weeks, which continued to progress despite multiple treatments with diode laser photocoagulation.

The right eye progressed to stage 4B ROP and was repaired with two surgeries — the last with a vitrectomy and silicone oil exchange.

Due to continued disease activity one month after surgery, intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 ml) was injected into the right eye 2.5 mm posterior to the limbus in the operating room after exam under anesthesia (Figure 1). RP

Figure 1. Color fundus photograph, taken with Retcam (Clarity Medical Systems, Inc., Pleasanton, CA) of the right eye after injection of bevacizumab (left) and two days later (right).

Kevin K. Suk, MD, is a vitreoretinal fellow at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. Audina M. Berrocal, MD, is associate professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer and Timothy G. Murray, MD, MBA, is professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer. Ditte Hess, CRA, is an ophthalmic photographer at Bascom Palmer. None of the authors report any financial interest in any products mentioned in this article. Dr. Suk can be reached via e-mail at KKSuk@med.miami.edu.


Retinal Physician, Issue: July 2010